How to Create a Family Emergency Plan

How to Create a Family Emergency Plan

Truth is, nobody really knows when a disaster will strike, or how bad they will get. Severe weather, natural disasters, house fires or even blackouts can place your family in danger. The best thing you can do is be prepared for the worst. That’s something Sootch, from SensiblePrepper, knows first-hand.

To create a successful emergency plan, you need to get your entire family on the same page. You need to have a crisis strategy, and everyone should memorize every aspect of it. This ensures if something happens to a family member, no information is lost. Remember that every person in the family – including kids – should have input.

Be sure to discuss different threats your family might encounter. Where you live plays a big part in this: you could have hurricanes, winter storms, or tornadoes to plan for. In coastal areas, tsunamis are a concern, too. The plan doesn’t only need to cover natural disasters; it should also cover home invasions, fires, direct attacks and thefts.

The three biggest items you need to cover are communication, supplies, and destination. Communication is key because the rest cannot occur smoothly without it, so focus on that first. Next is supplies; all the communication in the world won’t help if you don’t have supplies or a way to get them. This includes food, water, medicine, and other essential items.

The destination shouldn’t just be where you need to go during an emergency. This also includes where certain things are located, like first aid kits and firearms. Every member of the family should know where the breaker box and main breaker are located in case of a power outage. Similarly, everyone should also know where the gas shutoff is, how to turn it off, and which tools to use if it needs simple repairs.

Plan, prepare, and train, run drills to be sure everyone knows what to do in each situation. Your family’s safety depends on your plan and how you execute it – don’t take shortcuts or put your loved ones at risk. Cover every detail and aspect as thoroughly as possible to ensure no element is overlooked. Always remember it’s better to expect the worst and hope for the best than to only be half prepared.